Astromaterials Research & Exploration Science
METEORITE FALLS

WHY RESEARCH METEORITES?

WHY RESEARCH METEORITES?

WHY RESEARCH METEORITES?

Numerous scientists from all over the world have spent their careers studying meteorites because they contain a record of our solar system's history going back some 4.6 billion years. By researching meteorites, we can learn details about how our solar system evolved into the Sun and planets of today—and how meteorite impacts could affect our future.
Numerous scientists from all over the world have spent their careers studying meteorites because they contain a record of our solar system's history going back some 4.6 billion years. By researching meteorites, we can learn details about how our solar system evolved into the Sun and planets of today—and how meteorite impacts could affect our future.

WHAT METEORITES TELL US

STELLAR FORMATION

Some meteorites contain grains of dust (“stardust”) that were produced by stars before the formation of our Solar System. Studies of these presolar grains can increase our understanding of star formation and evolution.

SOLAR SYSTEM ORIGINS

Certain "primitive" meteorites contain the first solid material to form in our solar system. Researchers have used the age of this material — 4.568 billion years — to determine the age of our solar system. Many primitive meteorites have remained essentially unchanged since they formed, hence giving us a snapshot of the conditions in the early solar system.

HISTORY OF LIFE

Meteorites may have brought to Earth the components necessary for life – organic compounds such as carboxylic acids, complex amino acids, aliphatic amines, acetic acid and formic acid can be transported great distances inside space rocks. Additionally, large meteorite impacts, like the one ~65 million years ago that killed off the dinosaurs, can lead to major extinctions and influence the course of life on our planet.

REFERENCES

  1. Arizona State University meteorites.asu.edu. Retrieved on 20 June 2018.
  2. American Museum of Natural History amnh.org. Retrieved on 20 June 2018.

METEORITES 101

This step-by-step guide will show you how to locate meteorite fall sites using radar software and weather data along with info provided by reporting agencies and monitoring systems.
These instructions will show you how to best preserve the meteorites you discover and how to make contact with the organizations that are willing to accept and analyze your find.
Don't know exactly what a meteorite is, what they are made of or where they come from? If that's the case, we have provided a mini-"crash" course in what you need to know about them.
There's a lot going on in the study of meteorites, both here at NASA and in other places. Here are a few links to the people and institutions who are leading the research in this field.

METEORITES 101

This step-by-step guide will show you how to locate possible meteorite fall sites using radar software and weather data along with info provided by reporting agencies and monitoring systems.
These instructions will show you how to best preserve the meteorites you discover and how to make contact with the organizations that are willing to accept and analyze your find.
Don't know exactly what a meteorite is, what they are made of or where they come from? If that's the case, we have provided a mini-"crash" course in what you need to know about them.
There's a lot going on in the study of meteorites, both here at NASA and in other places. Here are a few links to the people and institutions who are leading the research in this field.

RECENT EVENTS

Learn more about Probable Fall near Carrollton, AL

Probable Fall near Carrollton, AL

November 10, 2018

This event was an early morning fireball over the Mississippi-Alabama border, that was reported by 17 eyewitnesses. This is recorded as American Meteor Society event number 4,773 for 2018.

Learn more about Glendale, Arizona

Glendale, Arizona

July 26, 2018

This event was an evening fireball over metropolitan Phoenix, AZ that was accompanied by one report of sonic booms. This is recorded as American Meteor Society event number 2624 for year 2018.

Learn more about Dishchii'bikoh, Arizona

Dishchii'bikoh, Arizona

June 2, 2016

This event was an early morning fireball northeast of Phoenix, AZ that was followed by numerous reports of sonic booms. This is recorded as American Meteor Society event number 1882 for 2016.

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