Astromaterials Research & Exploration Science
METEORITE FALLS

MOST RECENT EVENT
NATCHEZ MS

MOST RECENT EVENT
NATCHEZ MS

MOST RECENT EVENT
NATCHEZ MS

DATE/TIME

4/27/2022 @ 1303 UTC

4/27/2022
1303 UTC

LAT/LONG

31.553773 • -91.181204

31.553773
-91.181204

This is a calculated landing site map for meteorites seen in radar imagery color coded according to mass. Red is kg-mass meteorites, scaling down to yellow single-gram stones.

STREWN FIELD

This is a calculated landing site map for meteorites seen in radar imagery color coded according to mass. Red is kg-mass meteorites, scaling down to yellow single-gram stones.

SUMMARY

This meteorite fall was a daytime fireball that occurred at 8:03 AM local time on 27 April 2022, or 1303 UTC. The fireball was a bright daytime fireball and 60 eyewitnesses reported it to the American Meteor Society across MS, LA, AL, and AR. Many eyewitnesses reported hearing sonic booms from the falling meteorites.

Meteorites have been recovered from this event. As of this writing, at least ten meteorites ranging in mass from ~1 to almost 200g have been found within the bounds of the modeled strewn field image. Preliminary examination indicates it is an L type brecciated ordinary chondrite. The first meteorite was recovered by Linda Welzenbach Fries at 2:45 PM on Saturday, 30 April. She found the meteorite one hour after arriving on site.

This event is recorded as American Meteor Society event number 2591 for year 2022. Signatures of falling meteorites can be found in imagery from at least four nearby weather radars. In the NEXRAD weather radar network operated by NOAA, the KDGX (Jackson Brandon MS), KMOB (Mobile AL), KPOE (Fort Polk LA), and KLCH (Lake Charles LA) radars record signatures of falling meteorites.

The first appearance of falling meteorites on radar occurs at 13:04:30 UTC and 11,257 m above sea level (ASL) in the 1256 UTC data set for the KDGX radar in the 3.96 degree elevation radar sweep. Signatures consistent with falling meteorites appear in a total of at least 11 radar sweeps from the four radars, with a final signature appearing at 13:09:16 UTC.

LEARN MORE

RADAR & MAPS

This composite image shows all the radar signatures from falling meteorites as blue/gray polygons.

RADAR SUMMARY

This composite image shows all the radar signatures from falling meteorites as blue/gray polygons.

GET DIRECTIONS

Click on the View larger map link that is displayed in the address box above in order to get directions to the strewn field area.

EVENTS TO DATE

Learn more about other fall events and possible landing sites that have been identified across the United States.

EVENT UPDATES

Find out more about recent searches and possible discoveries that have taken place around the United States.

METEORITES 101

This step-by-step guide will show you how to locate possible meteorite fall sites using radar software and weather data along with info provided by reporting agencies and monitoring systems.
These instructions will show you how to best preserve the meteorites you discover and how to make contact with the organizations that are willing to accept and analyze your find.
Don't know exactly what a meteorite is, what they are made of or where they come from? If that's the case, we have provided a mini-"crash" course in what you need to know about them.
It turns out that meteorites have provided us a lot of scientific insight, not only into the origins of our solar system and planet Earth, but what the future might hold for mankind.
There's a lot going on in the study of meteorites, both here at NASA and in other places. Here are a few links to the people and institutions who are leading the research in this field.
This website is best viewed in landscape mode on tablet devices.
THANK YOU!
This website is best viewed in portrait mode on mobile devices.
THANK YOU!
This website is best viewed in portrait mode on mobile devices.
THANK YOU!