Astromaterials Research & Exploration Science
METEORITE FALLS

CARIBBEAN SEA NEAR PUERTO RICO

CARIBBEAN SEA NEAR PUERTO RICO

CARIBBEAN SEA NEAR PUERTO RICO

DATE/TIME

6/22/2019 @ 21:24:45 UTC

6/22/2019
21:24:45 UTC

LAT/LONG

14.998267 • -66.336777

14.998267
-66.336777

In lieu of a strewn field, this is an image from the GOES 16 GLM sensor showing the visible fireball as seen from orbit. Image Credits: SkySentinel, NOAA GOES 16, CIRA, Colorado State.

STREWN FIELD

In lieu of a strewn field, this is an image from the GOES 16 GLM sensor showing the visible fireball as seen from orbit. Image Credits: SkySentinel, NOAA GOES 16, CIRA, Colorado State.

SUMMARY

This event was a probable meteorite fall and extraordinarily powerful bolide (airborne fireball) that occurred on 22 June 2019 at 21:24:45 UTC. The event occurred over the Caribbean Ocean due south of Puerto Rico, into waters that are approximately 4.8 km deep. Events are recorded as “probable” if they produce well-defined signatures of a meteorite fall in weather radar imagery at the time and place described by eyewitnesses, but no meteorites have been recovered from the event to date. The fireball has not been reported by direct eyewitnesses due to its relatively remote location. However, the bolide was detected by the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) instrument on the GOES 16 weather satellite. Department of Defense satellites also report this event (https://cneos.jpl.nasa.gov/fireballs/) and calculate a total power of 6 kTons of TNT equivalent. A global infrasound network operated by the Preparatory Committee for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CNTBT) also recorded this bolide and reports a total power of 5 kTons TNT equivalent. This event is the third most powerful bolide recorded in the vicinity of North America since the DoD satellite network began reporting bolides in 1988.

Meteorites have not been recovered from this event to date. This event is not recorded by the American Meteor Society as there are no direct eyewitness reports.

In data from the NEXRAD weather radar network operated by NOAA, the TJUA (San Juan, Puerto Rice) radar record signatures of falling meteorites. The first appearance of falling meteorites on radar occurs at 21:26:15 UTC and 10.6 km above sea level (ASL) in the 21:25 UTC data set in the 0.48 degree elevation radar sweep. Signatures consistent with falling meteorites appear in a total of four radar sweeps, with a final signature appearing at 21:30:07 UTC.  This event occurred at extreme range from the radar (348 km) and radar image artifacts occur nearby in the imagery, but the features identified here as a meteorite fall occur at the location specified by GLM data, are linear in appearance like signatures of other meteorite falls, and only appear for a short period after the event time.

All meteorites from this event are on the seafloor at a depth of approximately 4.8 km.

RADAR & MAPS

This composite image shows all the radar signatures from falling meteorites as blue/gray polygons. This image is looking due north and has been tilted to show Puerto Rico (top of image) for context.

RADAR SUMMARY

This composite image shows all the radar signatures from falling meteorites as blue/gray polygons. This image is looking due north and has been tilted to show Puerto Rico (top of image) for context.

GET DIRECTIONS

Click on the View larger map link that is displayed in the address box above in order to get directions to the strewn field area.

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METEORITES 101

This step-by-step guide will show you how to locate possible meteorite fall sites using radar software and weather data along with info provided by reporting agencies and monitoring systems.
These instructions will show you how to best preserve the meteorites you discover and how to make contact with the organizations that are willing to accept and analyze your find.
Don't know exactly what a meteorite is, what they are made of or where they come from? If that's the case, we have provided a mini-"crash" course in what you need to know about them.
It turns out that meteorites have provided us a lot of scientific insight, not only into the origins of our solar system and planet Earth, but what the future might hold for mankind.
There's a lot going on in the study of meteorites, both here at NASA and in other places. Here are a few links to the people and institutions who are leading the research in this field.
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