Astromaterials Research & Exploration Science
METEORITE FALLS

VIÑALES, CUBA 01 FEB 2019 METEORITE FALL

VIÑALES, CUBA 01 FEB 2019 METEORITE FALL

VIÑALES, CUBA 01 FEB 2019 METEORITE FALL

DATE/TIME

2/1/2019 @ 18:17 UTC

2/1/2019
18:17 UTC

LAT/LONG

22.613415 • -83.7129

22.613415
-83.7129

Estimated landing site map, color coded by mass. Dark red is 10 kg-mass meteorites scaling down to yellow single-gram stones. Strong winds from the west shape the area. Green line is the meteor track.

STREWN FIELD

Estimated landing site map, color coded by mass. Dark red is 10 kg-mass meteorites scaling down to yellow single-gram stones. Strong winds from the west shape the area. Green line is the meteor track.

SUMMARY

This meteorite fall was a very bright daytime fireball that occurred at 2:17 PM local time on 01 February 2019, or 01 Feb 2019 18:17:10 UTC. The fireball was seen across southern Florida and reported by thirteen eyewitnesses to the American Meteor Society, but was widely seen across western Cuba as a bright daytime fireball accompanied by loud sonic booms. 

Meteorites have been recovered from this event, and images of stones ranging up to ~fist-sized have been widely reported in social media.

This event is recorded as American Meteor Society event number 513 for 2019. Signatures of falling meteorites can be found in imagery from the NEXRAD weather radar network operated by NOAA, observed from the KBYX (Key West) radar.

The first appearance of falling meteorites on radar occurs at 18:18:14 UTC and 10,600 m above sea level (ASL) in the 1816 UTC data set for the KBYX radar in the 0.88 degree elevation radar sweep. Signatures consistent with falling meteorites appear in a total of three radar sweeps from the KBYX radar, with a final signature appearing at 18:22:02 UTC.

This event was observed by a wide range of observational platforms, with especially detailed information available from the Geosynchronous Lightning Mapper (GLM) instrument on the GOES weather satellites. Among other observations, a small sulfur dioxide (SO2) atmospheric plume from the fireball was observed by the GOES-16 satellite. As an example of the data and media coverage available for this meteorite fall, see the following:

https://gizmodo.com/fireball-over-cuba-exploded-with-the-force-of-1-400-ton-1832346993

Calculations of meteorite fall mass are pendng at the time of this writing (05 Feb 2019).

Meteorites recovered from this event have not yet been classified by the Meteoritical Society.

LEARN MORE

RADAR & MAPS

Radar signatures from falling meteorites appear as blue/gray polygons. The western Cuba meteorite fall appears in imagery from the Key West NEXRAD weather radar at a distance of over 300 km.

RADAR SUMMARY

Radar signatures from falling meteorites appear as blue/gray polygons. The western Cuba meteorite fall appears in imagery from the Key West NEXRAD weather radar at a distance of over 300 km.

GET DIRECTIONS

Click on the View larger map link that is displayed in the address box above in order to get directions to the strewn field area.

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METEORITES 101

This step-by-step guide will show you how to locate possible meteorite fall sites using radar software and weather data along with info provided by reporting agencies and monitoring systems.
These instructions will show you how to best preserve the meteorites you discover and how to make contact with the organizations that are willing to accept and analyze your find.
Don't know exactly what a meteorite is, what they are made of or where they come from? If that's the case, we have provided a mini-"crash" course in what you need to know about them.
It turns out that meteorites have provided us a lot of scientific insight, not only into the origins of our solar system and planet Earth, but what the future might hold for mankind.
There's a lot going on in the study of meteorites, both here at NASA and in other places. Here are a few links to the people and institutions who are leading the research in this field.
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