Astromaterials Research & Exploration Science
METEORITE FALLS

HOW TO HANDLE METEORITES

HOW TO HANDLE METEORITES

HOW TO HANDLE METEORITES

First and foremost, meteorites are not harmful to humans or to any terrestrial life. Meteorite handling procedures are designed to protect the meteorite from terrestrial contamination and alteration, not to protect people from meteorites. The goal of proper meteorite handling is to minimize harm to the meteorites to preserve their scientific and aesthetic qualities.
First and foremost, meteorites are not harmful to humans or to any terrestrial life. Meteorite handling procedures are designed to protect the meteorite from terrestrial contamination and alteration, not to protect people from meteorites. The goal of proper meteorite handling is to minimize harm to the meteorites to preserve their scientific and aesthetic qualities.

WHAT TO DO

Collect and handle meteorites using clean gloves, tongs, or new aluminum foil. Common, household aluminum foil is a reasonable and inexpensive means to handle meteorites. Simply tear a fresh piece of foil off of the roll and pick up the meteorite with it. You can keep the foil wrapped around the meteorite indefinitely.
Keep the meteorite clean and dry. You can place it in a zip-lock bag to offer it a measure of protection against atmospheric humidity. Moisture absorption packages are beneficial as well. If you use one of these, place it in the bag but keep it out of direct contact with the meteorite. Keep the meteorite wrapped in aluminum foil, place a dessicant package in the bag with it, and keep it sealed.

WHAT NOT TO DO

Try not to handle any freshly fallen meteorites with your bare hands! Oils and microbes from your skin will slowly degrade the surface of a meteorite, dulling the fusion crust, contaminating the meteorite, and promoting rust. The contamination aspect is especially important for carbonaceous meteorites and other uncommon types.

WHO TO CONTACT

There are numerous institutions from all around the world who are currently accepting and analyzing meteorite finds. For the complete list of organizations, go to:

The Meteoritical Society / Collections & Repositories

https://www.lpi.usra.edu/meteor/MetBullAddresses.php?grp=country

WHAT ABOUT NASA?

NASA's meteorite analysis assets are currently fully engaged and cannot accommodate publically-acquired specimens. Please send your specimen to one of the collections or repositories listed on the Meteoritical Society website (the link above).

Your contribution will be greatly appreciated by these organizations and the broader scientific community.

METEORITES 101

This step-by-step guide will show you how to locate meteorite fall sites using radar software and weather data along with info provided by reporting agencies and monitoring systems.
Don't know exactly what a meteorite is, what they are made of or where they come from? If that's the case, we have provided a mini-"crash" course in what you need to know about them.
It turns out that meteorites have provided us a lot of scientific insight, not only into the origins of our solar system and planet Earth, but what the future might hold for mankind.
There's a lot going on in the study of meteorites, both here at NASA and in other places. Here are a few links to the people and institutions who are leading the research in this field.

METEORITES 101

This step-by-step guide will show you how to locate possible meteorite fall sites using radar software and weather data along with info provided by reporting agencies and monitoring systems.
Don't know exactly what a meteorite is, what they are made of or where they come from? If that's the case, we have provided a mini-"crash" course in what you need to know about them.
It turns out that meteorites have provided us a lot of scientific insight, not only into the origins of our solar system and planet Earth, but what the future might hold for mankind.
There's a lot going on in the study of meteorites, both here at NASA and in other places. Here are a few links to the people and institutions who are leading the research in this field.

RECENT EVENTS

Learn more about Hamburg, Michigan

Hamburg, Michigan

January 17, 2018

This event was a bright fireball over the Detroit, MI area that was accompanied by numerous reports of sonic booms. This is recorded as American Meteor Society event number 168 for 2018.

Learn more about Osceola, Florida

Osceola, Florida

January 24, 2016

This event was fireball seen against a daylight sky in northern Florida that was accompanied by three reports of sonic booms. This is recorded as American Meteor Society event number 266 for 2016.

Learn more about Creston, California

Creston, California

October 24, 2015

This event was an evening fireball near the California coast that was accompanied by fourteen reports of sonic booms. This is recorded as American Meteor Society event number 2635 for 2105.

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